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Visualizing Problems

Discussion in 'Beginner and Creation Help' started by peacrab, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. peacrab

    peacrab New Member Unsure/Questioning

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    So, as an artist, you'd think it'd be easy to use my mind's eye to visualize my tulpa and/or a wonderland, correct? Well, I'm having a horrid time trying to visualize anything. Even with visualization guides, I'm still having troubles. I assume it could be because I, a naturally anxious person, am not able to focus correctly on anything or calm down enough to focus. I've tried starting out from square one, literally. I can't even visualize a square. Or if I do, it automatically starts stretching and molding and spinning. It's very annoying. Does anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. FallFamily

    FallFamily Forum Goddesses Administrator Moderator Plural System Mixed-Origin System

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    [Breach] Perhaps try bringing in another sense to help. For example, tactile/touch might result in more stability. If so, you could, to take the square example, hold the square with our imaginary arms/legs/tentacles/whatever-you-prefer-for-yourself-inside and then try to visualize it. The tactile feel of the object might help keep vision stable. If it works on something simple, it might work on more complex things too.

    Another thing to try is to try to visualize the same thing. Say, if you do the square, don't visualize a square each time, but visualize THE square you made the first time each time afterwards. Each time, visualize it till it destabilizes too much and then stop. Over time, you might be able to keep your visualization stable for longer. The idea here is that since it is the same item, eventually it might get ingrained into memory enough that memory will help stabilize the visualization which then helps you keep your concentration on it and stabilize it or even hold it stabler when not concentrating, which then might carry over to other objects.
     
  3. Arjun

    Arjun Member Multiple System Is a host

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    From my experience of being unsuccessful, I recall my approach was mostly "mechanical" and it did not suit me. Mechanical, like I intend to see a picture, and tried to create it, adding detail after detail, and then trying to have the picture be amazing somehow. I had the idea I had to somehow fill in all the details before it would come alive.

    As I see it, there are two equally valuable but different ways. The first one is mechanical as described above and after a some time the visualization comes alive. The benefit is great detail. The other one is having the visualization come alive first, and let it take shape and detail more and more as time goes (as you repeat it in the future). The benefit in the second is it comes alive faster.

    I personally go for the second one more often. I call it a fluid approach where I instead let the images come, and encourage them to manifest. It is more about getting out of the way, and recognizing it is a kind of interplay with another force. Not a control of it, but interplay with it. Viewing that force as something within you or outside you does not matter, but what matters is the state of allowing it to move by itself as it wants to. It is more like just watching whatever appears, but not fully because you also allow yourself to interact and influence it. Open a space of allowance. Have an underlying intention. Let things arise as they do, and pay more attention to the things relating to your intention.

    I have found out a combination of both approaches aids me best. In the end I think both approaches merge into one united skill, but they can be experimented with individually.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2017