Small Worlds, Contained Inside-Visualization Guide

Discussion in 'Creation' started by Hidden Storys, Jan 9, 2016.

  1. Hidden Storys

    Hidden Storys Traveling the world without moving an inch

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    Small Worlds, Contained Inside

    Visualization Guide




    Where Are You?
    This short self assessment will tell you where to start!

    ((However, it may be wise to note that in the case you have a problem in one or two particular areas, you may want to look at the above table of contents before trying this, to save time and to see if it is a short exercise, or if you can skip right to it.))

    Can you imagine a square?

    [​IMG]

    Yes? Continue on to the next question.

    No? Go to Exercise one.


    Can you make the square into a cube?

    Yes? Continue to the next question.

    No? Go to Exercise one.


    Can you change the color of the cube?
    Yes? Continue on to the next question.

    No? Go to Exercise two.

    Can you add a border or design to the cube?
    Yes? Continue on to the next question.

    No? Go to Exercise two.



    Can you make your cube bigger or smaller?
    If you can make your cube bigger, but not smaller, go to exercise three.

    If you can make your cube smaller, but not bigger, go to exercise four.

    If you can do neither, go to exercise three.

    If you can do both, continue on to the next question.



    Can you create different shapes?

    Yes? Continue on to the next question.

    No? Go to Exercise five.


    Do you have a wonderland?

    Yes? You don’t need this guide.

    No? Go to Exercise six.


    Exercise One: Creating a Cube
    So you want to visualize, and you don’t know where to start. Hopefully this guide will change that for you a little! If these first exercises are too easy, you can just skim them and go forward. We’re going to start with a square, but by the end you’ll hopefully have a whole world! This is not a sure guide, and may not work for you. This is just one way to do it.

    So, visualize your square. It can be on paper, it can be on nothing at all, just a flat square. It can be any color, any color at all. If you can’t seem to do it at all, go down a paragraph. Hold that square there, as long as you can, then look away, and let it go. Do something else for a few minutes, then try to summon that square back.

    Can you do it? If not, try this. If so, skip this next section.

    If you can’t bring your square back, or can’t visualize it at all, take a look at the picture below. [​IMG]


    Now stare at this square for a moment, see how it’s lines… line up. See it’s details.

    Okay, so there aren’t many details here, it’s just a square, and it’s just… there. But! But!- This square is about to be your friend. You want to look at the square, and you want to memorize it, and then you want to put it in your mind. You want to stare at it, you want to zoom in on it, get closer to it, and you want to imagine it’s… blueness.

    Now, try to dissolve it, lose it, and bring it back. If you can’t do it… it’s right here. Practice until you can. Then move on.


    Okay, if you’re onto this step, then you have successfully visualized your square. Now we’re going to make it into a cube! So take your square, and imagine that you’re pulling out one side to it, perpendicular. Is it moving?

    Good! If not, try this. Imagine another square, then move it so it is facing the first square. Fill in the gap, but make sure they're the same distance from each other. If that doesn't work, try building the square face by face.
    Now, do the same thing as above, dissolve it, and remake it, dissolve it, and remake it.

    ((Note, if you find it hard to do the above, try with a dot. You can take a marker and draw one on a piece of paper, or look up a picture. Then stare at that until you can see it in your mind. On paper turn the dot into a line. Stare at that until you can see it in your mind. Then, make another line, coming off of the dot, so you have half of a square, or a slightly off L. Continue this process until you have a square in front of you. When this is done, see if you can get another marker and color it in.))



    Focus
    Is focus your problem? Well, I may have a solution! If you keep trying this exercise, you may get better!

    Think of a sentence or a list, or maybe a word, a sentence that you like. It can be a quote, it can be a grocery list, it can be your favorite word. Now write it down. Look at it for a moment, study the way the letters curve, the way it looks. Maybe say it aloud, taste it in that way you can taste words, and then close your eyes, or turn around and look at a wall. Start thinking of that sentence, the way it looked, the way it sounded, the way it felt when you said it. Think of nothing else, for as long as you can.

    If you find your thoughts veering, or you realize that you're suddenly thinking about puppies, or thunder, or any other random thing, then turn back around, look at the sentence, say it again, remind yourself what you're doing, and then think of it.

    Turn it into a game! Set a timer, and see how long you can hold the thought of that sentence in your head. Every time you repeat this exercise your focus may improve.

    Exercise Two: Color & Appearance
    So you have your cube that you can dissolve, and remake the exact same way.

    Now it’s time to change it!

    Alright, so we’re going to focus on the color of your cube now. You’re going to want to change it’s color now. Change it to yellow, or if it’s yellow, then change it to blue. ((Note, if you find this hard to do, change it to grey, or a color closer to blue.))
    Then change it to any color you want.
    Dissolve this cube and bring it back with it’s new color.

    Then give your cube an outline, thick black lines, pale green ones, bold blue ones… the color and type is up to you! (Outlines meaning the lines on the edges of the cube below)


    [​IMG]


    Realism
    Version One

    If realism is the problem, than this exercise may be for you!

    Imagine a cartoon or CGI pine tree, maybe it’s even a stick figure pinetree. Now, imagine that there’s a film over your vision, a nasty, yucky, orange film that you have to clean.

    Imagine wiping it away, and with every wipe your image gets more realistic.

    Once you have a mostly realistic image there, focus on it, imagine it’s every detail. How do it’s needles look? It’s bark?

    Zoom in and out of it, trying to keep that clarity and realism. Do this until you can keep it that way consistently.

    Keep trying and practicing this exercise with different objects and different things, and you will find that your ability to create realistic things improves!

    Realistically, there is no limit.


    Version Two

    Another way is a version I like to call the ripple effect. To start the ripple effect, make a fist in your mindspace. Then, flick your fingers outwards, so that you have a hand that looks like you’re about to cast a spell, or use telekinesis to move something with your hand.

    Take the cartoon image in your head, in my case, a cat, and move your hand forward, flicking your hand like taught above. Pretend that there’s a barrier between you and that object, in your mindspace, and that object is cartoonism. Strike the barrier and imagine a wave rippling from that spot that your hand hit outward. Where the wave travels, your scene changes to realistic.

    Then your cartoon/CGI scene will hopefully turn realistic.

    If these don't work, don't get frustrated! They are simply symbolic, ways I found that work for me. Try to come up with your own way to fix the cartoon/CGIness of your imagination.

    Exercise 3: Getting Bigger
    Do you have your new-color-with-bordered-edges cube? If not, revisit exercise 2, and try again. If so, excellent. In a few exercises, we’ll get to making a rectangle, but for now, we’re just going to be working on making your cube/box bigger.

    Imagine your box, bring it up and go to the section where it’s sitting. Now, imagine that you can make your box bigger, because, well, you can. Make it two times bigger, than three, than four. You can make it as big as you want!

    If you can’t seem to get your box any bigger than it already is, then you can do it manually. Pull up on one side, then the next, and do this for every side until your cube is a larger version of the old one!



    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Also, one last note. Don’t shrink your cube back down, even if you're able to.

    Presence
    Have you ever known a person is behind you, even though you didn’t see them? Can you feel them? This is an example of presence, and presence is something you need to be aware of for the next exercise. Not all things have presence, but many things do. Even inanimate objects can have presence, it just isn’t as strong as that of a living thing. Now, try to feel your cube’s presence. It has one, I assure you. Got it? Good.

    If not, try to focus on the presence of other people before going back to your cube’s presence.

    Exercise 4: Getting Smaller
    Focus on the presence of your cube. Then, do what you did with making it larger, but make it smaller. Hold onto that presence, then make your cube so small you can’t see it.

    Press down on the sides if you can’t get it small right away, collapse it, make it so tiny, cut it in half, whatever you need to do to get it smaller. So small that you can’t see it. Let go of your cube then, go do something else for 15 however many minutes you want, and then come back. Focus on it, is the presence still there? If so, continue on. If not, remake your cube and start over.

    Perspective
    (Alternate title: The Wonderland is Not the Real World)

    The statement above may seem pretty obvious, but to really show you what I mean, you must first zoom in on your cube until it appears the same size as it was before you shrank it. Draw closer and closer, and watch it get bigger and bigger.

    By doing the above, you have changed your perspective in such a way that would be hard to do in the real world, if not impossible. Now, zoom out again.

    Your box is gone, isn’t it?

    Everything is perspective, and perspective is not the same in the wonderland.

    Now, make your cube larger. Larger even still, until it is towering over your small perspective. Then make your perspective larger.
    Do you see how things are not the same? By zooming in and out, you can remake the simplest things.



    Exercise Five: Other Shapes
    So, cubes are boring, right? Yeah, we can probably all agree with that. So, that’s why we’re going to try making other shapes. Perhaps your mind works in a way that allows you to create other shapes, if so, good for you! Feel free to skip this step. If not, well, then, we have a few different options.

    Option One: Take Off What It Isn’t
    Have you ever heard that quote about carving away what isn’t the shape? Or in the case of the quoter, the statue? That’s our base here. We’re going to take off what isn’t needed in the shape of your choice. So imagine your cube, and let’s say you want to make a triangle. Imagine a giant blade, or knife, or some other thing coming down and slicing away what isn’t needed. [​IMG]




    The red on the above drawing would be where you would cut, and the triangle would be what you’re left with. You can do this to make any shape, it just might be harder, with say, a circle.


    Option Two: Mold a New Shape
    Imagine your rectangle is made of clay, and that you can pick up this clay, touch it. Take a chunk, leaving a missing place in your rectangle. Roll it in your hands. Make a sphere, make a triangle. Smoosh it like play dough and use your hands to make it into shapes. Fold it and mold it, make circles and squares, rectangles and stars.


    Option Three: Raise it From the Ground
    In the same way you made your rectangle, make your new shape. Let’s say you’re trying to make a triangle. Imagine it flat, and then pull it out of the flat, make it 3D.[​IMG]

    Practice making objects until you no longer need to rely on these methods and can conjure them up from thin… wonderland air.





    Avatar; Your Form in the Wonderland
    Consider for a moment, what you want to look like in your wonderland. Do you want brown hair? Blonde hair? Blue eyes? Green? Gray? Do you want to be human? Do you want to look like yourself?

    Option A: I want to look like myself

    Option B: I want to look like something inhuman

    Option C: I want to look like a human, but with different features.(Includes short paragraph on inhuman features.)

    Option D: What I want to look like isn’t listed.





    Exercise Six: The Exciting Part: Wonderlands
    Alternate title: Build, Build My Minions
    Now that you know how to make different shapes in the Wonderland you can try to make everyday items, like forks or clouds. If you find yourself unable to do this, fashion shapes that look like them. For example, rectangles can be a snowflake, and that triangle-square house you drew in your first year of school is about to be your best friend. You can start with these objects, going as in detail as you want.

    [​IMG]






    So, you can hopefully now build many shapes and objects. If not, please revisit “Shapes and Objects.” Now, we’re going to build a portal, because who wants their wonderland in this place stuffed full of random shapes? No, this was your testing ground. You can skip this part and just work on the same space you have been, just go to the next paragraph if you want to, but if you’d like a new editing place, start by making a shape. It can be a circle, a square, an arch. It doesn’t have to be more complicated than that, but you can complicate it by adding designs, swirls, borders.


    After that, step through it and imagine yourself appearing in a blank space, no colors, no anything. Then, add a sky, turn it blue. Add clouds, maybe outer space. Then begin the map. Will you have all grassland? Or a forest? Some swamps? Lakes? Oceans? It’s up to you. When your feet touch down on the ground for the first time, start some weather. Maybe rain, wind, or snow.



    Tulpas
    Now that you have your wonderland, you can start imagining your characters. This will go in much the same way as you put yourself in, but without putting your personality into it. Tulpas can also choose their own form, making one appear by themselves. Give them the freedom to choose what they look like.



    Ending
    Congratulations! You’ve successfully made a wonderland. To continue this, you can add buildings to your wonderland, statues, and more. Hopefully this guide helped you, and thanks for reading! If some things are hard, just keep trying.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
  2. FallFamily

    FallFamily Forum Goddesses Administrator Moderator Plural System Mixed-Origin System

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    [Hail] How many characters is it and does it use any fancy formatting? If it is just above the character limit, it could be increased a bit to let you post it more easily (I think our character limit is on the low side so I don't oppose increasing it a bit).
     
  3. Hidden Storys

    Hidden Storys Traveling the world without moving an inch

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    I actually don't believe that it is above the character limit, simply that it would take a bit of scrolling to get to the bottom. As for formatting, I edited the post above to copy and paste it in. Other than a few small issues with images that I was able to get cleaned up, and taking out some links, it copied over. I fixed up a bit of the space by removing the white space between sections.
    EDIT: Some of the images came out larger than anticipated and I can't seem to fix that.
     
  4. FallFamily

    FallFamily Forum Goddesses Administrator Moderator Plural System Mixed-Origin System

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    [Tri] Read your guide and overall, it is a good guide. We haven't seen a good step by step starting from basic shapes and working upward anywhere yet, so this is new.

    Let's go in order

    We think that this is one of the best parts in the guide. It gets the reader to try to do these things without help and then they find out just what they can do on the spot. And then, depending on what they can do, you tell them where to start. This is very good because not everyone starts in the same place - beginners need to start from the beginning and more experienced people know they can skip a few exercises instead of reading the first bit and thinking this guide is not for them and moving on from the guide entirely. It is also good that the reader tries to do the tasks on their own first, even if they fail. Gives them a bit more feel for it.

    This is pretty good. The only problem we can think of is that some people do struggle to visualize a square even. All guides do have to start at some base level meaning some people won't be even there. This is OK. Just, one has to know that there will be some people it is too high level for. We aren't saying you need to change your guide. Just, when people talk about it or ask you questions about it, be aware that some people are not quite to the level where Exercise 1 is doable for them. Not many people will be in that boat. We have only meet one person in that boat, but it is a boat that does exist. Your guide does do a really good job though of starting from a simple enough place that the boat of people not ready to even start the guide is quite small.

    The only real problem in this section is that the instruction for how to turn it into a cube is a bit ambiguous. Pulling out one side of it could also turn it into a non-square rectangle. You need to emphasize that it needs to be pulled perpendicular to the face of the square or something like that. Or perhaps, imagine a copy of the square, move the second square behind the first, and then fill in the gap between the two squares to make a cube.

    We think that this is a good exercise. Good enough to be worthy of a post in and of itself as a small Focus Tip.

    Pretty good. Is there a reason you picked yellow for a blue cube, or was that a random choice? We ask because yellow is about as different a color from blue as you can get in certain ways (but not others) due to how the brain processes color. Is it recommended to try changing it to a similar color first (say grey or turquoise), or a very different color (yellow, red, etc.), or does it matter at all?

    These are two very creative and good symbolic suggestions. Nothing wrong with them. Very good use of symbolism in fact. Just, maybe you should note that the reader can try to use symbolism here to increase the realism and then pitch these two methods as two examples of how it could be done. This way, if those two don't work for someone, they will know that they need to get creative and try to come up with something that works for them instead of getting frustrated. And your two examples will give them ideas for them to try to come up with their own versions, which is good.

    This is very good, especially the suggestions for how to actually make it bigger. In the first few sentences, we noticed that you used "rectangle" to describe your box/cube. This could confuse someone. Maybe change it to cube/box to avoid confusion.

    This is good. One question. Is there a reason this is part of Exercise 3 instead of a bit further down very early in Exercise 4?

    Good.

    This part was a wonderful additional piece here. Good place to remind the reader about certain things of what they are making and their senses.

    All three of these options are good ones and explained well.

    The link for Option C doesn't work. It says one has to log in first, unlike the others. What is and where is Option D?

    The alternate title is quite amusing. Overall, not too bad here except for one problem. One problem is that people may not yet be able to just make all sorts of things. After all, if they got here, they can make shapes. There is a decent gap between shapes and say a sky or snow. Maybe suggest that they try to make more complicated objects, either by composing them of simple shapes, making a skeleton of simple shapes that they then try to fudge to be more complicated objects (imagine a house first as a cube and a triangular prism on top of it and then steadily fudge it to become more houselike), etc. and then saying that eventually, you will just be able to make complicated things like snow outright with enough practice. The reader needs a few ideas and techniques to bridge the gap here.

    Pretty good here
     
  5. Hidden Storys

    Hidden Storys Traveling the world without moving an inch

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    I would try to improve here, but I'm not certain how much more basic I could go, nor how I would do it. Perhaps I'll put something about starting with a dot, or what you see at the back of your eyelids. I'll try to improve this.

    Will fix. I like the suggestion also, I'll add that in somewhere, if that's okay?

    I chose blue because it's a rather ordinary color that you see everywhere, unlike, say, bright red, or orange. I chose yellow for the exact opposite reason, that it's not one seen as commonly. I will change this section to suggest that if you're having trouble with yellow that you should try perhaps grey or a similar color change

    Will also add that, never thought to do so before, but now that you mention it, it does sound like something that will be helpful.

    I didn't notice that before, thank you, I will switch that around to cube/box.


    I did that for formatting. This actually isn't part of Exercise 3. It alternates between side lessons and Exercises, so you might find something you need, or just an extra in between them. I figured that it would be better to put this before Exercise 3.

    Oh... Oh dear. I didn't even notice that I skipped Option D. There is not actually an Option D. There should be, but instead apparently there is an Option E. Oops. I will fix this. I will also fix Option C.

    I could've done this part better- I'll fix that too.

    Thank you for pointing out these and taking the time to type up your comment. I'll make sure that they get resolved.

    EDIT: I added what you suggested to the above guide and fixed the errors.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2016
  6. FallFamily

    FallFamily Forum Goddesses Administrator Moderator Plural System Mixed-Origin System

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    [Tri] Your guide is much improved. Only thing we can really see is that the link to the image for Exercise 6 isn't working. One needs to be logged into Google to access it. It is the same problem that Option C had previously.

    By the way, once you fix the link, your guide is in good shape for sharing widely we think.
     
  7. Hidden Storys

    Hidden Storys Traveling the world without moving an inch

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    I attempted to fix Option C? I'll try again, and fix the image.
     
  8. FallFamily

    FallFamily Forum Goddesses Administrator Moderator Plural System Mixed-Origin System

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    [Hail] What Tri meant was that Option C was fixed but that image had the problem that Option C used to have in the original version. Both are working now.
     
  9. Hidden Storys

    Hidden Storys Traveling the world without moving an inch

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    Ah, sorry that I got confused. Glad to hear that they're working.