Remaining focused on your innerworld/wonderland for the anxious mind

Discussion in 'Other Tips And Articles' started by Nia, Dec 14, 2017.

  1. Nia

    Nia New Member

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    Hey all,

    So my system has some sort of anxiety disorder and I'm the most affected member. For the longest time, I have had no method for remaining centered/focused on the innerworld because of anxious thoughts and feelings. My attention would dart back and forth from the innerworld to front and also I would have a sensation that I was falling down while walking and just general panic.

    Stage 1: Acceptance
    However, I have found a solution with some logic behind its workings. I had been reading the book Stopping The Noise In Your Head and one thing I've learned from it is not to fight anxiety, but instead to acknowledge it and accept it. So in order to quiet those anxious thoughts and panic while trying to see and interact with your innerworld, you need to accept everything.

    In order to implement this, it can help (but is not required) to have a partial list of things to keep in mind when accepting. You should list the following: 1) Your current feelings: Whatever they may be, good, bad, neutral or mixed; 2) Your current situation: This should include what you're currently doing, things you were doing before, deadlines, social situations, recent experiences, and whatever else you may think is affecting your current state of being.

    Now that you've got a list (or can summon a mental one on the fly if there aren't too many things on it), you can begin.

    1. Get into a comfortable, safe position in a quiet room where you will not be disturbed. If a quiet room is not available, opt for a mostly empty room (if possible) with either ear plugs or headphones. I find this works best with complete silence, but some are able to focus well with music or soundtracks.
    2. Become aware of any stimuli you are taking in. This includes sensations from all five senses. Note these sensations. Keep a mental list.
    3. Repeat the following or similar mantra (I find it's best if it's said in my head rather than aloud, but experiment here as every mind is different): "I accept my current feelings. I am currently feeling (list your current feelings here). I accept my current situation which includes (list current situational things here). I am currently feeling (list currently felt sensations here)." Repeat this mantra while accepting what you are listing. In this context, accepting simply means acknowledging that something exists.
    4. If you have deadlines or things that you feel a need to take care of, you have two choices. You can either 1) Handle it, or if you can't or it is not convenient at this time; 2) Note that it will be taken care of later. This should be noted while reciting the mantra.
    5. Keep repeating the mantra a few times until you feel neutral minded or at least reasonably neutral minded.
    6. You can either attempt to access your innerworld/wonderland at this stage or optionally move onto the next stage. For me, the next stage is just as important as the first, but again, experiment.

    Stage 2: Let go/give up:
    You will often hear the phrase "let go" in meditation. For me, the phrase was very ambiguous and for me, ambiguity does not help. So instead, if that phrase does not have adequate meaning, I suggest replace "let go" with "give up". Giving up fully means relinquishing control of the body, and letting whatever is playing out currently take its course without you.

    I suggest you take the attitude of "I can't handle this (while thinking of your emotions/situations). I just give up." By doing this, you are letting go of control which will allow you to step away from front just enough to control your innerworld body without panic.

    With a neutral mindset, direct your attention to your innerworld body. It can help to start with one sense initially in order to focus the mind on that one sense rather than attempting to dart focus back and forth between senses, which may generate stress and cause you to lose the control you just achieved.

    Conclusion:
    This method has helped me progress and I wanted to share it with other people who wish to access their innerworld/wonderland easier.
     
    Kitsch likes this.